Le Harve - Aki Kaurismäki (2012)
…is one of the most precise and elegantly composed films I have seen all year. A worthy companion piece to the excellent Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, ‘The Kid with a Bike’ (2012). Check out Michael J. Anderson insightful review of both over at Tativille.
Over at Girish’s blog he makes this astute note about the Dardenne’s brothers film…
…The Greek verb “kineo,” to set in motion, is often claimed to be the root of the word “cinema.” I responded to this film with a primal force because it’s about ceaseless movement. Running, pedaling, chasing, being chased, climbing, falling, ducking, darting, hurrying: the film is a virtual catalogue of these (and other) dramatically urgent forms of movement. There’s a great moment when the kid shows off his prowess on his bike by stopping it and balancing himself to a point of complete stillness for an instant. It’s a quietly humorous moment — an apotheosis — because it tells us that movement is the natural state; it is stillness that must be achieved with the special application of skill.
Both films play at the IFI and Lighthouse cinemas, Dublin. Unfortunately though, no where else on the island.
The Poster above is designed by the Italian comic book artist Manuele Fior and it is truly wonderful. m

Le Harve - Aki Kaurismäki (2012)

…is one of the most precise and elegantly composed films I have seen all year. A worthy companion piece to the excellent Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, ‘The Kid with a Bike’ (2012). Check out Tativille.

Over at Girish’s blog he makes this astute note about the Dardenne’s brothers film…

…The Greek verb “kineo,” to set in motion, is often claimed to be the root of the word “cinema.” I responded to this film with a primal force because it’s about ceaseless movement. Running, pedaling, chasing, being chased, climbing, falling, ducking, darting, hurrying: the film is a virtual catalogue of these (and other) dramatically urgent forms of movement. There’s a great moment when the kid shows off his prowess on his bike by stopping it and balancing himself to a point of complete stillness for an instant. It’s a quietly humorous moment — an apotheosis — because it tells us that movement is the natural state; it is stillness that must be achieved with the special application of skill.

Both films play at the IFI and Lighthouse cinemas, Dublin. Unfortunately though, no where else on the island.

The Poster above is designed by the Italian comic book artist Manuele Fior and it is truly wonderful. m

Notes

  1. eggswithoutyolks reblogged this from imagefuturist
  2. w3bpresence reblogged this from imagefuturist and added:
    I’ll be watching this.
  3. imagefuturist posted this